It was an incredible day out there today and we were lucky to not have any rain during our tour! We did have wind however and traveling in Johnstone Strait this morning there was some wave action as well the sighting of our first Humpback Whale for the day which was very exciting. We made our way through the Plumper Islands into Blackfish Sound where we found the sea condition calm and very inviting. The orcas were reported to be making their way west in the Sound having made the turn into Blackney Passage from Johnstone Strait just as they have done so for the past several days. The A30’s, a family of 10 orcas were resting and moving slowly to the west and with our main-sail hoisted we commenced to sail and did so for the entire length of our viewing time with them while trailing our hydrophone behind us enabling our passengers to listen to their A-Clan calls and ecolocation. We observed as A30 the Matriline and her oldest surviving son A38 traveled closest to Hanson Island while her other son A39 and daughters A50 & A54 with their young off-spring made their way closer to the Swanson Island shoreline. Passengers observed foraging, pectoral slapping and playful interaction between the younger orcas. It was a fabulous experience sailing quietly beside them while observing at times as they lunged, chasing after salmon. In the distance another Humpback Whale was sighted and we made our way in that direction watching as several Dalls Porpoises were actively feeding alongside the Humpback Whale with numerous diving birds all of them feeding on herring. With Stellar Sea Lions swimming around the whale and many more observed hauled out the viewing could not have been better and yet it was when a third Humpback Whale was sighted in Weynton Passage. This one was identified as “Freckles” and has been sighted frequently over the summer. There were four Humpback Whales in the area today. Other sightings included: Harbour Seals+, Rhinoceros Auklets, Common Murres, Pigeon Guillemots, Surf Scoters, Red-necked Phalaropes, Bald Eagles, Mew and Herring Gulls and numerous migrating birds flying high including a flock of Common Mergansers.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s