Each and every tour is different from any other and so is was today that en route to Alder Bay this morning we could see the blow of a Humpback Whale in Weynton Passage and while we were docked in Alder Bay two young mink could be seen playing with each other and running up and down the dock in a curious manner. Leaving the dock we headed in the direction of the blow that we had seen earlier and near to Weynton Island two Humpback Whales were sighted; they had been identified as Domino and Butterfly and it was fabulous to see these whales so early in the tour. We carried on further east to see three orcas (A12 & A36’s) who had been sighted traveling to the west, A12 was foraging very close along the Vancouver Island shoreline, A46 was parallel to her some 300 meters away while A37 was far behind crossing over towards Hanson Island where he could be seen foraging before moving back towards Blackney Passage. A12 and A46 continued foraging to the West, A12 going the furtherest past Blinkhorn before she turned back to the east. Prior to her reaching Blinkhorn several Dall’s Porpoises were seen porpoising back and forth around her. Meanwhile, across to Hanson Island two Humpback Whales were seen, one of which was breaching++. We made our way in their direction across Johnstone Strait, watching as the humpback whale continued to breach, effortlessly it seemed! As we drew closer our passengers had supreme viewing of KC, the breaching Humpback Whale, it was phenomenal viewing for all on board! Watching their dive sequence as the two large whales moved along, one following the other was charismatic and wonderful. Close by Stellar Sea Lions could be seen hauled out and swimming in the water and the sound of their roar filled the air in the stillness of the afternoon. We headed home via some scenic waterways where large kelp forests could be seen floating in the current along with hauled out harbour seals and in the distance another Humpback Whale was sighted. Other sightings included: rhinoceros auklets, common murres, herring, california, mew and bonaparte gulls, belted kingfishers, red-necked phalaropes, black turnstones, a fork-tailed storm-petrel, surf scoters and bald eagles.

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