Humpback whales ++ today on tour

humpback whale and dalls porpoise

humpback whale and dalls porpoise

humpback whale and log barge

humpback whale and log barge

It was another phenomenal day of viewing pristine island waterways and marine-life, beginning this morning with the sighting of some 10 + bald eagles ( juvenile and mature) feeding together

humpback whale

humpback whale

fluke

fluke

on the beach at low tide on our arrival into Alder Bay and then the surprise close encounter once again of a mother river otter and her four kits; seeing them on the rocks and in the water while we were docked was a marvellous

fluke sequence

fluke sequence

dive sequence

dive sequence

way to begin our tour. Heading out the day was clear and the water calm and we were able to scan for blows well into the distance. A humpback whale was sighted through Weynton Passage and as

dive sequence

dive sequence

island scenery today

island scenery today

we drew nearer and waited the humpback whale surfaced nearby and in our observations that followed, the whale was diving some 8 minutes at a time and taking 2-3 breaths between. Making our way through the Plumper Islands we scanned for more blows and could see some in the far distance and another down in Blackfish Sound and then the whale that we had seen earlier, Argonaut reappeared having made its way out through Weynton Passage as well. We headed down Blackfish Sound and caught up with the humpback whale there, it too was taking long dives this time with only 1-2 breaths between dives. Yet another humpback whale was sighted, this one was travelling along the Swanson shoreline and so began some wonderful sightings. As we observed it resting for lingering moments on the surface we all enjoyed its graceful presence, mesmerized by its breathing rhythm and sensational diving sequence time and again. Another humpback whale blow and fluke were seen further away out in the Queen Charlotte Strait and in total, there were 6 + humpback whales today in the area. Other sightings included: dall’s porpoises, harbour seals, rhinoceros auklets, red-necked phalaropes, cassin’s auklets, black oyster catchers and pigeon guillemots. Photo’s to follow:

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