Resident orcas: A30’s, three humpback and one minke whale

a30-290713-mumcalf Humpbak290713 A30-3-290713 A30-pod-1290713 Fog-290713Leaving the dock this morning we did so in heavy fog and made our way through Weynton Passage and into Blackfish Sound stopping frequently to listen for calls on our hydrophone and also for orca, humpback and minke whale blows which can be heard from far away in dense fog. At last the sound of a humpback whale blow was heard, seemingly coming towards us in Blackfish Sound just as the fog was beginning to clear and as we waited for the whale to surface, the fog was suddenly swept away like a veil and the pristine beauty of  Blackfish Sound, looking in the direction of Blackney Passage and beyond was suddenly revealed. The gorgeous coloured teal blue sea was stunning to look at as was the sky and everything in between and then, there they were, two humpback whales swimming in close proximity to one another, coming to the surface to breathe before diving and it was wonderful seeing them in such a beautiful blue setting at the bottom end of Blackfish Sound. In that same moment, orcas, the A30 Matriline had been sighted at the top end of Blackfish Sound appearing suddenly out of the fog and as we looked, we could see their dark dorsal fins making their way towards us.  It was incredulous to witness their regal beauty, and as one passenger told us, it was like a fairy tale. Being surrounded by white fog one moment and in the next seeing two humpback whales followed by orcas who majestically proceeded to the east in Blackfish Sound, abreast one another in a travelling line and surfacing in unison, their synchronized swimming mesmerizing to watch, it was a moment in time of unbelievable beauty where nothing else mattered. On the way home, yet another humpback whale was sighted and while approaching Alert Bay, a minke whale was also seen. Other species seen today: dall’s porpoises including two riding at the bow of the boat, harbour seals, black oyster catchers, bald eagles, pigeon gullimots, rhinoceros auklets, red-necked phalaropes, herring, mew and glaucous-winged gulls.

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