Orcas, Humpback whales and so much more!

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Seasmoke photo’s have been cropped and taken with a telephoto lens.

Our sightings today: Resident Orcas, Humpback whales, Dall’s porpoises, Harbour seals, a Black-tailed deer with her fawn, Bald Eagles, Belted Kingfishers, Black Oystercatcher, Cassin’s and Rhinoceros Auklets, Red-Necked Phalaropes, a Great Blue Heron and Gull species.

Having seen Orcas the previous day we are always curious as to where they ventured during the night and whether they would still be in the area the following day. Like all things in nature, the animals know how to utilize their environment in the best way possible as survival of their species is paramount.  Often we observe our resident orca traveling in the same direction as the current and turning soon after the current has turned. On this particular morning they entered Johnstone Strait via Weynton Passage at the end of the flood.

Our skipper, while crossing Weynton Passage scanned far ahead and thought he saw blows in the distance.  As he came closer, he confirmed his sightings of blows to be that of Orca and later it became clear that we had the same pods from yesterday. The I15’s and A30’s were all spread out and travelling steady in an easterly direction in Johnstone Strait. It is astonishing to watch these individuals surfacing to breathe at the exact same time as their other family members whom are traveling meters (and at times kilometers) apart, as though they are instinctively synchronized.

Later that morning as the sun peeked out from behind the clouds, a feeding frenzy of numerous birds that swarmed above the sea, caught our attention. This was an indication that there was a bait ball of small schooling fish below the surface, attracting birds and Humpbacks alike. We observed Humpback whales foraging close to shore amongst the picturesque islands and islets that were fringed with rocks and kelp forests and pleasantly littered with Harbour seals. Hundreds of Red-necked Phalaropes and numerous gulls continued to occupy the water this morning creating a lively symphony of sound from Mother Nature.

Every day we are blessed to experience such natural delights and how privileged we are to share it all with our visitors.

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