Awe-inspiring and wonderful!

 

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August 31st

Our sightings:

Orcas, Humpback whales, a Minke Whale, Stellar sea lions, Harbour seals, Bald Eagles, Red-necked Phalaropes, Rhinoceros and Cassin’s Auklets, Common Murres, Gull species and Belted Kingfishers.

On a calm and overcast afternoon we departed from Alert Bay and then Alder Bay to begin our adventure in the Broughton Archipelago.

Our first whale encounter was a local resident Humpback called Inukshuk and as we drifted with our engines turned off in silence, due to the stillness of the air and sea, we could see and hear blows of two more whales. Underway again, we visited the area where Stellar sea lion males were hauled out on a large exposed rock that jutted out from a small forested islet. Some of the Sea Lions were positioned way above the high tide mark due to their agile ability to move about on land. As graceful swimmers in water, on land they are able to manoeuvre with considerable ease. Their front flippers are able to extend forward to prop themselves up, and their back flippers can turn under and be utilized like fused together feet.

The Orcas were travelling west in Blackfish Sound and we enjoyed viewing the A30’s.  They were spread out, some were observed foraging and others resting. It is difficult to imagine that the world’s largest dolphin needs to keep one side of their brain awake in order for them to remember to surface and breath. At one point we noticed they had all turned and were travelling back, east in Blackfish Sound.

Our last port of call was at the top end of Blackfish Sound where we witnessed approximately eight more Humpback whales. One identified as Moonstar was indulging in a feast using the bubble net feeding technique. More Humpbacks were sighted as we headed for home as well as a glimpse of the smaller Minke Whale.

It was another eventful day in the straits and passageways of this marine mammal paradise.

Seasmoke Whale Watching photo’s have been taken by Dave Jones with a telephoto lens and have been cropped.